Fields from specific power lines

Use the links in the table to find the field for any specific power lines.

 

400 kV thumbnail photo of L6 pylon thumbnail photo of transmission pylonThe highest voltage used in the UK, carried on lattice steel pylons
400 kV – special cases thumnail of t-pylon thumb-L34 thumb-low-heightNew designs like the t-pylon, and other less common designs like single-circuit and low-height
275 kV thumbnail photo of L6 pylon thumbnail photo of transmission pylonAlso used for transmission, and carried on the same sorts of pylons as 400 kV
132 kV thumbnail photo of 132 kV pylon thumbnail photo of 132 kV wood poleUsually carried on lattice pylons, but smaller than for 400 kV.  Sometimes carried on wood poles
66 kV  thumbnail photo of 132 kV pylon thumbnail photo of 132 kV wood poleRare in the UK; where used, similar to 132 kV
33 kV thumbnail photo of 33 kV wood poles thumbnail photos of 33 kV wood polesCarried on wood poles, or sometimes on small lattice pylons
11 kV thumbnail of distribution wood poleUsually carried on wood poles
400/230 V thumbnail of 400 V separate phases wood pole thumbnail of 400 V aerial bundled conductor

Used for the final distribution into homes, usually with a vertical array on wood poles

 

All these graphs show the actual field values. The alternative of presenting fields as percentages of the maximum field can be misleading. These calculations assume the currents within each circuit are balanced, which makes little difference to the higher fields at closer distances but can affect the smaller fields at larger distances. More on the effect of balance.